THE RUDOLF HESS COLLECTION OF ARTWORK OF

ADOLF HITLER

HESS WAS ONE OF ADOLF HITLER's CLOSEST FOLLOWERS AND PERHAPS HIS MOST DEVOTED. A FELLOW MARCHER IN MUNICH IN 1923, A CELLMATE AND AMANUENSIS IN LANDSBERG PRISON WHO NEVER LEFT HIS SIDE THROUGH THE TUMULTOUS RISE TO POWER IN THE LATE 1920s AND EARLY ‘30s. FROM 1933 TO 1941 AS DEPUTY AND REICHSFUEHRER. E RETAINED EVERYTHING FROM HIS 'MASTER' THAT HE COULD GET HIS HANDS ON AND, AFTER HIS FALL FROM GRACE IN 1941,  HIS WIFE, ILSE, MAINTAINED HIS COLLECTION. SHE EVENTUALLY PARTED WITH IT UNDER THE CONDITION THAT NOTHING FROM THE COLLECTION WAS TO BE OFFERED FOR SALE UNTIL THE 30TH ANNIVERSARY OF HER HUSBAND'S DEATH. RUDOLF HESS DIED IN SPANDAU PRISON IN AUGUST OF 1987 AND SINCE 30 YEARS HAVE NOW PASSED, WE HAVE THE DISTINCT PRIVILEGE OF OFFEREING THESE ITEMS FOR THE FIRST TIME ANYWHERE ON THIS WEBSITE!

***EACH ITEM IN THIS COLLECTION HAS BEEN PROFESSIONALLY EXAMINED AND COMES WITH PROPER DOCUMENTATION,

A C.O.A. AND OF COURSE FULL MONEY BACK GUARANTEE FOR AUTHENTICITY***

Rudolf Hess looking down at the man he adored and worshiped

 

Rudolf Walter Richard Hess

(Heß in German; 26 April 1894 – 17 August 1987)was a prominent politician in Nazi Germany. Appointed Deputy Führer to Adolf Hitler in 1933, he served in this position until 1941, when he flew solo to Scotland in an attempt to negotiate peace with the United Kingdom during World War II. He was taken prisoner and eventually was convicted of crimes against peace, serving a life sentence until his death by suicide.
Hess enlisted in the 7th Bavarian Field Artillery Regiment as an infantryman at the outbreak of World War I. He was wounded several times over the course of the war, and won the Iron Cross, 2nd class, in 1915. Shortly before the war ended, Hess enrolled to train as an aviator, but he saw no action in this role. He left the armed forces in December 1918 with the rank of Leutnant der Reserve.
In 1919, Hess enrolled in the University of Munich, where he studied geopolitics under Karl Haushofer, a proponent of the concept of Lebensraum ("living space"), which later became one of the pillars of Nazi Party (National Socialist German Workers Party; NSDAP) ideology. Hess joined the NSDAP on 1 July 1920, and was at Hitler's side on 8 November 1923 for the Beer Hall Putsch, the failed Nazi attempt to seize control of the government of Bavaria. Whilst serving time in jail with Hitler in Landsberg prison for this attempted coup, Hess helped Hitler write his book, Mein Kampf, which became a foundation of the political platform of the NSDAP. After the Nazi seizure of power in 1933, Hess was appointed Deputy Führer of the NSDAP and received a post in Hitler's cabinet. He was the third most powerful man in Germany, behind only Hitler and Hermann Göring. In addition to appearing on Hitler's behalf at speaking engagements and rallies, Hess signed into law much of the legislation, including the Nuremberg Laws of 1935, which stripped the Jews of Germany of their rights. Like so many at the time, Hess saw in Hitler a God-like figure. He adored him and Hess (like the president of the AH Fan Club) also held on to certain works that were given to him over time during the 30s such as the Breker portrait of AH used for the massive bust of AH he created.
Hess continued to be interested in aviation, learning to fly the more advanced aircraft that were coming into development at the start of World War II. On 10 May 1941 he undertook a solo flight to Scotland, where he hoped to arrange peace talks with the Duke of Hamilton, whom he believed to be prominent in opposition to the British government. Hess was immediately arrested on his arrival and was held in British custody until the end of the war, when he was returned to Germany to stand trial in the Nuremberg Trials of major war criminals in 1946. During much of the trial, he claimed to be suffering from amnesia, but later admitted this was a ruse. Hess was convicted of crimes against peace and conspiracy with other German leaders to commit crimes and was transferred to Spandau Prison in 1947, where he served a life sentence. Repeated attempts by family members and prominent politicians to win him early release were blocked by the Soviet Union. Still in custody in Spandau, he died by suicide in 1987 at the age of 93. After his death the prison was demolished to prevent it from becoming a neo-Nazi shrine. (source Wikipedia)

Rudolf Hess' widow, Ilse Hess wrote this note to Dr. Octavius J. Pastore, Jr., M.D. which translates:  
According to Rudi (Rudolf) there were three Jewish frame shops in Vienna. These shops were also galleries at the same time, frequented by tourists and locals alike. In fact, many known Jewish businessmen used these galleries to buy art, not only for their homes but also for their offices. The three shops were Jacob Altenberg, J. Kubie and Samuel Morgenstern. These poor guys all lost their shops because of the Aryanization after the annex. The people who bought these shops for a ridiculously low price had to turn in all paintings of the Führer. Rudi expressed it like this: ‘All that was taken from the Jews by these men, we now have [he is talking about the AH art] but they did not complain. See, this is the difference between the Jews and the real Germans. The Fatherland comes first.’ Of course in the end he received everything. Somebody had to do the right thing, to protect the inheritance. In the end this became my responsibility [after Rudi took off to Scotland]. And now, dear Sir, this responsibility has become yours. Ilse Hess

The collection of the Artwork of Adolf Hitler assembled by the NSDAP

After becoming chancellor, Hitler tried to quell public interest in his paintings. On an exceptional basis he had permitted Heinrich Hoffmann in 1935 to issue a limited edition of a portfolio of seven wartime works. Why and why then is not known. Publication, coinciding with the introduction of military conscription in Germany, may have been intended to highlight his own wartime service. A similar portfolio was later circulated among Hitler Youth groups. Four of these wartime paintings and one of the courtyard of the Old Residenz in Munich were included in a propaganda publication issued in 1936, Adolf Hitler: Pictures from the Life of the Fuhrer, 1931-1935. Similar articles were published in two American publications, Esquire in 1936 and Collier's two years later. But that was the end of it.
In June 1937 publishing any comment on his works was outlawed and several months later exhibiting them was banned. When Martin Bormann informed Hitler that a number of Nazi party newspapers and journals planned to publish color reproductions of seven wartime paintings along with a number of other works in special issues on the occasion of his fiftieth birthday in April 1939, Hitler emphatically forbade it. In January 1942 his paintings were declared to be 'valuable national cultural property' and as such had to be registered with authorities and might not be sold outside Germany.
But there are limits even on dictators' ability to dictate. Once Hitler was in power, his paintings became collectors' items. In Vienna some people came to realize - to their amazement - that the new German chancellor was none other than that diffident young man from whom they had bought a watercolor or two several decades earlier. Prices soared.  Jacob Altenberg, the noted Vienna frame shop/gallery owner had purchased some twenty-five works from Hitler and some were still in stock.  Samuel Morgenstern, another framer with three locations in Vienna similarly had a number of Hitler’s pieces unsold. 
In the meantime Hitler had been doing his utmost to get physical control of as many paintings as possible. Responsibility for tracing them was given to the Hauptarchiv der NSDAP, the central party archive, which had been set up in Munich in 1934 under the aegis of Rudolf Hess as deputy of the Fuhrer. Its purpose was to collect - and often confiscate - documents concerning Hitler's past so as to prevent anything embarrassing from reaching the public. In tracking down Hitler's paintings, the agency tried to persuade owners to sell them to the Hauptarchiv or at least to permit them to be authenticated, photographed and catalogued. As they went about their duties, archival officials also interviewed anyone who had known Hitler in his early years - thus acquiring the testimonies about Hitler's youthful aspirations to be 'a great painter'. The operation was directed by Ernst Schulte-Strathaus, who delegated the practical work of collecting, authenticating and cataloguing to Wilhelm Dammann and August Priesack.
Finding the paintings was obviously far from easy. Vienna was the main target. Before 1938 it was a responsibility of Otto von Stein, counsellor of the German legation in Vienna, to acquire those he could locate. Within days of the Anschluss, German and Austrian security officials scoured the city. Although Morgenstern and Altenberg had maintained some records, most works were scattered without a trace. Even when they were found, some owners refused to give them up. “As a member of the party, he declined to sell the pictures by his beloved Fuhrer and complained that he had had more than enough trouble with the Gestapo precisely because of the paintings,” read one report. The problem was further complicated by the fact that party officials liked to have a Hitler or two on their walls at home or at the office. Eventually the Hauptarchiv had to pay large sums - as much as 8000 marks ($15,000 in today’s money) - for those that could be located. When Heinrich Hoffmann proudly showed Hitler a watercolor he had just purchased - this was in 1944 - Hitler commented, “These things should not go for more than one hundred and fifty or two hundred marks today. It is insane to pay more than that.” But the insanity went on and he was the cause, having certainly authorized the payments. In the end archival officials were able to account for fewer than eighty paintings. Forgeries along with genuine but badly done works were destroyed as they surfaced.
Once the war began, the operation petered out and a projected catalogue was never issued. But up to the end of the Third Reich, as party and government files show, Hitler had understandably lost interest in the project. Rudolf Hess, ever the adoring sycophant, took over and retained control of the artwork thus accumulated. Before his fateful flight to the UK, he deposited the collection with his wife, Ilse Pohl Hess through which the current offerings descend.

Please click on the link below to see

 

Offered for sale is

THE RUDOLF HESS COLLECTION OF ARTWORK OF

ADOLF HITLER

We are proudly presenting a collection of artwork with great historic value from the hands of Adolf Hitler, collected and preserved by his Deputy and fanatic follower Rudolf Hess. After Hess undertook his faithful flight to Scotland in 1941 his wife ended up with these artifacts until she decided to sell the collection to Dr. Octavius J. Pastore. Nearly 30 years later these treasures are for the first time offered for sale on the open market! Please find below a table with links to the listings of the individual pieces and once again, the authenticity of all items and that they all are genuine pieces of art by the hands of Adolf Hitler is guaranteed by Mr. Stephen Pastore and he provides a written statement confirming that, free of charge for each of these items.

Where does this collection come from?

Dr. Octavius J. Pastore, Jr., M.D. attended medical school at the University of Bologna, Italy, from 1954-1960.  He was a Third Reich scholar and collector, fluent in Italian and German. During the summer recesses, he would travel to European capitals looking for pieces for his collection. After medical school, Dr. Pastore returned to the States having made many friends in Europe, even marrying a lovely German girl. His interest in the Third Reich never waned and he maintained contact with people of similar historical interests while practicing medicine. This network of friends and fellow hobby-historians learned of and then  informed him of the Hess collection after it was publicly announced that Rudolf Hess, Hitler’s devoted follower and Reichsfuhrer had died a mysterious death as the sole remaining convicted defendant at the War Crimes Tribunal in Nuremberg. He died at Spandau on August 17, 1987. Pastore contacted several lawyers he knew and it was not long before he got in touch with and finally met Mrs. Rudolf Hess, the faithful Ilse Hess. Several months passed before a contract was finalized covering the part of the Hess estate that she intended to part with.
With a large artist’s portfolio in hand and a suitcase with some books and papers, Pastore brought the collection back to the United States where it resides today. Kept in an antique architects’ folio desk, the Hess collection joined the Kubizeck collection.  Ironically, these two friends of Adolf Hitler, who were truly his friends and who remained loyal until their own deaths, were united in the Pastore collection.  Mrs. Hess stipulated that nothing be made public in any fashion about the transaction for thirty years after Rudolf’s death. This thirty year restrictive covenant expired on August 17, 2017. It is time these historically significant artifacts find new homes, new eyes to view them, new voices to discuss them and new approaches to understanding them and their creator, one of the most complex people in the history of the human race.
Dr. Pastore was Stephen R. Pastore’s brother. Stephen developed an interest in Hitler’s art in the early 1990s. Stephen Pastore is a historian, art expert and author of books on the various editions of Mein Kampf as well as the author of the best study of Adolf Hitler artwork. His book is available through Amazon and another book will be coming out in 2018 (see picture of the cover at the bottom of this page), containing the until recently unknown Adolf Hitler masterworks from the Kubizek and Hess collections. Mr. Pastore also did forensic examining when he worked as a prosecutor in earlier days of his life. He used forensic equipment to examine and authenticate every item from this collection of historic artifacts and will provide a COA free of charge for each of the pieces that are offered here.

This is the original portfolio of the Samuel Morgenstern framing company in Vienna that contained all the unframed Adolf Hitler art that was confiscated from this and the other two Non-Aryan frame shops where Hitler did business when he was a young artist. Because of the good business relationship that Samuel Morgenstern thought he had with Hitler, Morgenstern wrote him a letter to ask for some kind of compensation for the confiscation of his business and its inventory in 1938, so that he and his wife could leave the country and start a new life somewher else, for which they needed some funds. Unfortunately the letter was intercepted by Martin Bormann and Hitler probably never was aware that Bormann arranged that the Morgensterns were sent to a concentration camp where they perished.

 

“Aryanization” is the term used to describe the economic (businesses, companies) and asset-related (real estate, apartments, tenancy rights) seizures perpetrated against the Jews under the National Socialist government It is important to differentiate between the two forms of Aryanization: the so-called “wild Aryanizations” and the pseudo-legal expropriations carried out on the basis of anti-Semitic legal provisions. The former reached their climax in Austria in March and April 1938 and often took place with brutal force and destruction during the course of the looting and plundering raids. In order to bring these massive legal violations and the subsequent damage to the economy under control, during the course of 1938 a series of legal provisions were enacted by the National Socialist authorities which were based on the existing anti-Semitic legislation in the German Reich, based on the Nuremberg Racial Laws of 15 September 1935.
The coincident effect of the Anschluss and subsequent Aryanization and the call by the NSDAP to collect all the extant artwork by the Fuhrer played havoc on Jewish gallery owners and the non-Jewish buyers of their businesses. The three most prominent Jewish art shops in Vienna—80% of all Austrian Jews lived in Vienna—were Samuel Morgenstern & Son, Jacob Kubie and Jacob Altenberg. The NSDAP collection held under the auspices of Rudolf Hess’s office represent the unsold stock of Hitler’s paintings still on the shop premises or, and there is no direct evidence that has yet come to light, these paintings were recovered from the consumer-purchaser. In either event, the collection offers up a look not only of the mainstream artistic taste of the time but also the style of frame employed. Interestingly, the unframed artworks from the Morgenstern collection are obviously pieces which never sold. Several of these pieces have in common Hitler’s attempt at branching out from the touristy urban scenes he specialized in to scenes of deserted streets, alleyways, public transportation, etc. These works are generally unpopulated by even a single human figure; others have one or two isolated Viennese in cold stark surroundings—some at night, others in graying shadows. It is little wonder that these did not sell to happy tourists or locals looking to simply decorate their homes or offices. However, beyond any doubt, these are the pieces that most demonstrate the dark side of Hitler’s thinking even as to his art which hitherto has seemed blind to any sort of negativity. The NSDAP collection of Jewish framers gives the world the first real view of Hitler the artist, as opposed to Hitler the scenic painter. We are fortunate to have the ability to offer up this insightful collection.

THE ADOLF HITLER ART CONFISCATED FROM THREE 'NON-ARYAN' VIENNESE FRAMERS:

F - 419a AH WATERCOLOR 'Gendarme' in Altenberg frame

 

F - 419b AH WATERCOLOR 'Innenhof' (Courtyard) in Altenberg frame
*SOLD*
F - 419c AH WATERCOLOR 'Six views of the Journey to the Family Manor' in Morgenstern frame
F - 419d AH WATERCOLOR 'Treppenaufgang' (Stairway) in Altenberg frame
*SOLD*
F - 419e AH WATERCOLOR 'Turmspitze' (The Steeple) in Altenberg frame
*SOLD*

 

F - 419f AH WATERCOLOR 'Sonntag Morgen' (Sunday Morning) in Kubie frame
F - 419g AH WATERCOLOR 'Fuettern der Voegel' (Feeding of the Birds) in Kubie frame

 

F - 419h AH WATERCOLOR 'Heimbuecher Gasthaus' (Heimbuecher Guesthouse) in Altenberg frame

 

F - 419i AH WATERCOLOR 'Promenade' in Altenberg frame

 

F - 419k AH PASTEL COLOR 'Turmuhr' (Clock Tower) confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern

*SOLD*

F - 419l AH PASTEL COLOR 'Tueroeffnung' (Doorway) confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern

 

F - 419m AH PASTEL COLOR 'Dorf um Mitternacht' (Midnight Village) confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern

 

F - 419n AH PASTEL COLOR 'Nachbarn' (Neighbors) confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern

 

F - 419o AH CHARCOAL DRAWING 'Seehof' confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern

 

F - 419p AH PENCIL DRAWING 'Steiner Gasthof' (Steiner Guesthouse) confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern

*ON HOLD*

F - 419q AH WATERCOLOR 'Ladenansicht' (Storefront) confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern
*SOLD*
F - 419r AH WATERCOLOR 'Sonntag Nachmittag' (Sunday Afternoon) confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern
*SOLD*
F - 419s AH WATERCOLOR 'Turm' (Tower) confiscated from Samuel Morgenstern

*ON HOLD*

 

od43 is a division of Warneke, Inc. P.O.Box 2844, Rapid City, SD 57709-2844 USA

All photos and descriptions are Copyright © 2018 by Warneke, Inc.